# 32508

Photographer unidentified.

Hobart Town, looking south [and] Hobart Town, from the harbour. A pair of two-part panoramas, late 1860s.

$1,300.00 AUD

Two photographic panoramas mounted on three leaves removed from a mid-19th century album. They appear to have been taken around the same time, or slightly later than, Samuel Clifford’s 1868 two-part panorama of Hobart from Lime Kiln Hill (Libraries Tasmania, Clifford Album 1, “Tasmanian Scenes”).

I. Hobart Town looking south / Tasmania. [View of Hobart from Lime Kiln Hill]. Two albumen print photographs, in identical format 180 x 210 mm; the first (the left-hand half of the panorama) is mounted verso of leaf [2], and the second (the right-hand half of the panorama) is mounted recto of leaf [3]; both views are taken from the same vantage point, and together provide an almost uninterrupted 180-degree view. Mounts with captions in ink repeated beneath each image.

II. Hobart Town from harbour. [View of Hobart looking northwest towards Salamanca Wharf]. Two albumen print photographs, in identical format 180 x 210 mm; the first (the left-hand half of the panorama) is mounted recto of leaf [2], and the second (the right-hand half of the panorama) is mounted verso of leaf [1]; these views are contiguous and form a panoramic view of the Hobart foreshore, with ships riding at anchor. Mounts with captions in ink repeated beneath each image.

Condition: All four prints are strong images with excellent tonal range, in good condition with a tolerable amount of light wrinkling and some edge fading. They are mounted at each corner with the original album compiler’s strips of double-sided tape (circa 1870!); they could be removed from the album pages relatively easily by a conservator.

These photographs would have been acquired by an overseas visitor to Tasmania from a single source – perhaps a Hobart bookshop or picture framer – and the fact that they have a uniform format and similar print quality is further evidence that points to one photographer being responsible for both panoramas: probably one of Samuel Clifford, Thomas Nevin or Alfred Winter.