# 21861

MORI, Mariko (1967 - )

Star Doll (for Parkett no. 54)

$2,200.00 AUD

Zurich : Parkett Edition, 1998. Doll figurine with microphone, earphones, white boots, white stockings, red plaid skirt, top in blue, black and white, transparent bracelets, yellow shoulder pads, brooch and blue hair, a mint copy housed in original packaging box and mailing carton. Box measures 31.7 x 15.2 x 8.8 cm.; doll measures 25.4 x 25.4 x 5 cm. Edition of 99 copies. Accompanied by a certificate of authenticity signed by the artist.

A rare editioned multiple by Japanese contemporary artist Mariko Mori, influenced by her background as a fashion model in the 1980s and the rise of cosplay and the performative fashion trends in the Harajuku district of Shibuya. ‘Star Doll (for Parkett no. 54) (1998), a small, editioned sculpture based on a figure modeled on the artist, is a kind of Barbie doll for the cyber age that both affirms the power of icons and makes a critique of their emptiness’ (Hasegawa).

“In Star Doll, Mori explores how images of women are presented through the media and through celebrity figures. Star Doll is an 11-inch-tall figurine that sports short pink hair, headphones, white go-go boots, and a plaid miniskirt. Mori based this character on her life-sized sculpture Birth of a Star (1995), an image in which she is dressed up as what she has called a “virtual pop star.” Imagined as a celebrity who lives in a cyber realm, the figure is a fantasy that reflects Japan’s obsession with technology. As Mori once said, the character is “someone who needs to be created.”

Born in Tokyo, Mori studied fashion and worked as a model before attending art school in London. She returned to Tokyo and began to use her art as a way to comment on the roles of women in Japan: “I had been outside Japan long enough to have perspective on it. I was quite upset about how women are treated there compared to how women are doing in Western society. I felt like I had a voice and could create some kind of social critique.” – Museum of Modern Art website https://www.moma.org/learn/moma_learning/mariko-mori-star-doll-for-parkett-no-54-1998/

“I had been outside Japan long enough to have perspective on it. I was quite upset about how women are treated there compared to how women are doing in Western society. I felt like I had a voice and could create some kind of social critique.” Mori said, “When you wear clothes you become a personality, you become the clothes.” – Claudia Lloyd blog https://claudialloyd.wordpress.com

‘Solo exhibitions of Mori’s work have been organized by Centre National d’Art Contemporain de Grenoble (1996), Dallas Museum of Art (1997), Los Angeles County Museum of Art (1998), The Serpentine Gallery in London (1998), Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg (1999), Fondazione Prada in Milan (1999), Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris (2000), Kunsthaus Bregenz (2003), Koyodo Museum in Chino, Japan (2006), Groninger Museum in Holland (2007), and the BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art in Gateshead (2009). Her work has also been included in major group exhibitions like Venice Biennale (1997 and 2003, Istanbul Bienali (1997), Sydney Biennial (2000), Shanghai Biennale (2000), São Paolo Bienal (2002), Moving Pictures at the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao (2003), and Singapore Biennale (2006). ‘  – The Guggenheim website https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/artist/mariko-mori

References:

HASEGAWA, Yuku, Performativity in the work of female Japanese artists in the 1950s – 60s and the 1990s, contained in : Modern Women: Women Artists at The Museum of Modern Art, New York : MoMA, 2010, p. 347

LAZZARI, Margaret and SCHLESIE, Dona, Exploring art: a global, thematic approach. Sydney : Wadsworth, 2016 (fifth edition), p. 323, figure 11.13 (illustrated)

Collections : Museum of Modern Art, New York (another example).

Provenance : Christies New York, sale 16785 Contemporary Edition, 27 February 2019, lot 152